What is the best Nes clone as far as sound and video ?

What is the best Nes clone as far as sound and video ?
by on (#64309)
Just wondering to play Nintendo games and Famicom japan games
as far as sound and video. I own a retro duo and a yobo fc what would you guys recommend over these two systems as far as better sound and graphics. I own 3 real nes hardware , just like the compact size of a clone.
please give me some thoughts. Thanks

by on (#64346)
As far as I can recall, there is still no clone that matches the NES. I don't know if and don't think any of them fix the sound duty cycle issues, and I don't know if any will work properly with the MMC5 or not. Clones just aren't worth it in my opinion. If you want something more compact maybe try a NES2/AV Famicom?

by on (#64486)
MottZilla wrote:
As far as I can recall, there is still no clone that matches the NES. I don't know if and don't think any of them fix the sound duty cycle issues, and I don't know if any will work properly with the MMC5 or not. Clones just aren't worth it in my opinion. If you want something more compact maybe try a NES2/AV Famicom?


Thanks great answer...

by on (#64502)
AFAIK every non-NOAC clones usually have these annoniying vertical lines like in the NES2. Some of them have even better compatibility than original NES (Dendy)

In the other hand, NOAC-based clones usually have good video quality, but very bad sound quality

Keyboard-like NOAC-based computers have the worstest video and audio quality, but well... IT'S A KEYBOARD!!!1!11!

by on (#64515)
I have a Retro Duo and it seems to do pretty well hooked up via AV

by on (#64998)
If you want a clone that us compatible with more games, then you need one that is pure HW-based, not a NOAC.

The NOAC systems have problems with MMC6, some MMC4 and many non-licensed mappers, like Tengen, and of course, the PowerPak.

The older clones from the 80s/90s are essentially Famicom hardware with slight differences, but none of them are perfect...they just work better than the FCTwin and Yobo junk.

I agree with the above suggestionL If you want to avoid a toaster NES, and want a small-footprint, i suggest a Famicom, either A/V (aka New Famicom) or an original Famicom (Red & White).

The A/V model is more expensive though. You van mod an original FC for A/V out pretty easily, as long as you have some basic soldering experience, or use it through a VCR.

If you want to buy one, send me PM, as I have them in stock and ready to go out the door, and I can also do the A/V mod for you if you want t order one that is already set up for it.

The Pocket Fami is a good option as well for a portable system, but it sucks for NES games because it needs an adapter. (It is the best system for FC carts on the go though.)

There may be a portable NES out there now too, but they are almost always crummy Taiwanese junk, and depending on what games you want to run, YMMV. Avoid the 'Game Theory Admiral' at all costs! It sucks at running Famicom games... Even SMB3 is one big glitch on the GTA...

We really need hardware-accurate emulation in an FPGA package. (The NOAC was originally designed to run Atari games!)

-Xious

by on (#65002)
Xious wrote:
You van mod an original FC for A/V out pretty easily, as long as you have some basic soldering experience, or use it through a VCR.

Due to the FCC requirement for ATSC digital tuners, which are still expensive due to unexpired patents on MPEG-2 video and AC3 audio, a lot of newer VCRs allow only line-in recording. So not only would you have to use a VCR, but you'd have to use a used VCR at that.

Quote:
We really need hardware-accurate emulation in an FPGA package. (The NOAC was originally designed to run Atari games!)

Kevtris made one, but he declines to make it available for a reason that I forget. Jwdonal's VeriNES is probably the best hope in this case. One problem with FPGA is that you have to use a 5.0 V tolerant CPLD to buffer (and possibly help translate) signals between the lower-voltage FPGA and the cartridge hardware. This shouldn't be too much of a problem once it's finished and the Chinese can implement the thing in one big ASIC.

by on (#65010)
tepples wrote:
...a lot of newer VCRs...

Do newer VCRs even exist? I though they were officially discontinued.

by on (#65018)
VCRs still exist because they're cheaper than DVD recorders. I'll check how many line-in vs. ATSC tuner models are available next time I'm in a Walmart*.

by on (#65021)
tepples wrote:
Kevtris made one, but he declines to make it available for a reason that I forget.

(trimmed)

This shouldn't be too much of a problem once it's finished and the Chinese can implement the thing in one big ASIC.


I think this is mostly why.. it's a huge up-front investment and a risk, but almost everyone would balk at the price it would have to sell for to break even (even though the parts get cheaper, it will never be 'cheap enough' to compete with the clones available now). I've seen lots of people complain about the price of the PowerPak (which seems like a fair price to me), but imagine how much more they would complain if there was a Chinese clone of it that sold for $15, and the only downside is some inaccuracies that most of the people using it wouldn't even be looking for. Almost no one would buy the PowerPak then, and I imagine a system clone would go the same way.

by on (#65149)
First time poster here, so I haven't established any credibility yet (I found out about NesDev while researching the PowerPak), but I do have a large collection of consoles and play NES and SNES more than any other machines.

I currently own multiple toaster NES', a NES2 and a Famicom AV. For what you are describing, specifically small size and the ability to play both USA and Japanese games, I would HIGHLY recommend you buy a Famicom AV. They are certainly a little bit pricey on ebay (over $100) but I think you'd be very happy with it. The unit itself is tiny, is much better looking than the US top loader, and the quality of the AV output is flawless (no jail bars like on AV modded USA top loaders, and a crisper picture to my eyes than on toaster NES'). It has the 'standard' plug Nintendo used on the SNES, SFC and N64, so you can use any old SNES video cable you have lying around, and also the same controller ports as the USA NES' so you can use all of your regular NES controllers directly.

One challenge you will have is finding a cheap 60-72 pin adapter to play US games, but the 'Family Converter' one that doesn't have a cartridge shell is pretty easy to find and a lot of the ebay auctions for Famicom AV's throw one on in. I spent quite some time finding a nicer adapter with a cartridge shell on eBay, but you can take your time with that. While you might find the use of the adapter a bit annoying when playing US games, one thing I do like is that I have an extra 60-72 pin family converter that I use only when trying out or playing old dirty NES games I get on ebay, and I don't have to worry about dirtying my actual cartridge slot. I only use my nicer 60-72 pin adapter for games that I have thoroughly cleaned, and then I make sure to clean any Famicom games before they go in.

Hope this helps out, good luck in your search.